TGen-led study of more than 70,000 individuals links dementia to smoking and cardiovascular disease 

Significantly, women impaired more by smoking; men impaired more by cardiovascular disease

PHOENIX, Ariz. — May 13, 2021 — In the largest study of the associations between smoking and cardiovascular disease on cognitive function, researchers at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, found both impair the ability to learn and memorize; and that the effects of smoking are more pronounced among females, while males are more impaired by cardiovascular disease.

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Flinn Foundation selects 20 excelling Arizona students as 2021 Flinn Scholars

Twenty of Arizona’s highest-achieving high-school seniors have been awarded the prestigious Flinn Scholarship and will receive a full ride at one of the state’s public universities.

Now in its 36th year, the Flinn Scholars Program is supported by the Phoenix-based Flinn Foundation in partnership with Arizona’s three state universities. The merit-based scholarship covers the full cost of tuition, mandatory fees, housing, meals, study abroad, and many other exclusive opportunities—a package valued at more than $120,000.

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Just Announced: Additional SME COVID-19 Relief

As the country moves into a new phase of the vaccination effort – one where all adults are eligible for vaccinations – we want to ensure that you are aware of a new tax credit that President Biden announced today. The new paid leave tax credit will offset the cost for employers with fewer than 500 employees to provide full pay for when their employees get a COVID-19 vaccination or recover from that vaccination.

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Mayo study finds colon cancer driven by hereditary gene mutations in 1 in 6 patients

ROCHESTER, Minn. — A new Mayo Clinic study bolsters evidence that colorectal cancer is often imprinted in family genes and passed on from one generation to the next.

In the study, published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, researchers within the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine found 1 in 6 patients with colorectal cancer had an inherited cancer-related gene mutation, which likely predisposed them to the disease. In addition, the researchers discovered that 60% of these cases would not have been detected if relying on a standard guideline-based approach.

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Biodesign Professor Dr. Alexandra Lucas Wins Third Annual ASU Faculty Startup Challenge

Serpass Biologics, Dr. Lucas’ startup, is developing a new class of immune-modulating biologics for autoimmune disorders. These can be used to treat and suppress excessive immune system responses in a wide range of diseases, including arthritic, cardiac, gastrointestinal, pulmonary and vascular disorders.

 The annual competition is run by Skysong Innovations, which works across the university to help researchers pursue commercial applications for their work.

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Fruit Flies and Cellular Demise – Zeroing in on the Causes of ALS

New UArizona research has identified a previously unknown pattern of protein creation in the motor neurons, which are the cells that malfunction in patients with ALS. By restoring the missing proteins at one end of the cell, movement returns. Next, the team hopes to determine if the surprising over-production at the other end of the cell also has consequences.

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TGen identifies gene that could help prevent or delay onset of Alzheimer’s disease

Boosting ABCC1 could lessen the production of plaque linked to Alzheimer’s development

PHOENIX, Ariz. — April 13, 2021 — Findings of a study by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, suggest that increasing expression of a gene known as ABCC1 could not only reduce the deposition of a hard plaque in the brain that leads to Alzheimer’s disease, but might also prevent or delay this memory-robbing disease from developing.

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